I built my two storey extension for 20% of builder's quotes

This site shows how - step by step from design to completion

Removing Chimney Breast

anglePrior to building the new extension, I will need to knock down the present single storey. Unfortunately, this is my kitchen and bathroom. So that we can continue to live in the house during the extension process, I will need to make some temporary provision. My plan, therefore, is to make the major internal alterations to the existing property first, as this will afford me a new large room (ultimately the lounge) which I can temporarily fit out as a kitchen and shower / toilet.

I have decided that the only job I will not tackle myself is the removal of the load bearing wall and insertion of the steel. That said, I have found a friendly builder that supports my project and is happy for me to do all the preparation, leaving him and his team to take responsibility for supporting the wall on acro props and for insertion of the steel.

I do not wish to alter the appearance of my period house from the outside, but the removal of the wall will include a chimney breast. My first job is to fit the chimney support bracket in the loft.

Prior to building the new extension, I will need to knock down the present single storey. Unfortunately, this is my kitchen and bathroom. So that we can continue to live in the house during the extension process, I will need to make some temporary provision. My plan, therefore, is to make the major internal alterations to the existing property first, as this will afford me a new large room (ultimately the lounge) which I can temporarily fit out as a kitchen and shower / toilet.

I have decided that the only job I will not tackle myself is the removal of the load bearing wall and insertion of the steel. That said, I have found a friendly builder that supports my project and is happy for me to do all the preparation, leaving him and his team to take responsibility for supporting the wall on acro props and for insertion of the steel.

chimney 2I do not wish to alter the appearance of my period house from the outside, but the removal of the wall will include a chimney breast. My first job is to fit the chimney support bracket in the loft.

chimney 1The chimney before I started. 

I cut into the mortar line and inserted a piece of angle iron. I then used angled and vertical props to brace it and hold it in place. It is not a large chimney breast so I trusted this would be adequate.

chimney 3Fortunately, the lime mortar made it relatively easy to start cutting out the bricks. I cut out sufficient courses to allow for the bracket. Even though my props were holding perfectly well, I decided to add the short props, as I had to leave it overnight.

The bracket was to be held up with threaded bar anchored into the brickwork using resin. I flattened the end of the bar to a kind of chisel point to prevent it from unscrewing through the hardened resin.

 

 

 

 

chimney_4-5

chimney 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had my nephew weld up a gallows brackets chimney for me (to the structural engineer's design).The Bracket in place.The angle iron is still in there whilst the resin sets.

chimney 7

 

 

 

This is the chimney breast in the bedroom. It looks all lovely, but now that the brickwork is no longer responsible for holding the chimney up, I can set at it with a bolster.

I started knocking out the bricks. Messy job! It's also a bit scary to be knocking down bits of the existing house

Downstairs was just more of the same. Not a nice job, but the more I could do, the cheaper the builder's bill would be.

 

 

 

 

 

chimney 8

 chimney 9